Underclassman Camp Top Prospect Team

The top overall performers from the sixth-annual Bank Hoops Underclassman Camp. Further camp coverage will include the 2019, 2020 and 2021 all-camp teams, and more player evaluations.

MVP Davis Lukomski  6-7  So  Novi Catholic Central: The next Quinn Blair out of REACH and the Catholic League. He battled defensively against bigger post players in drills, then showed his versatility in games playing inside and out. Ran the floor well, finishing with soft hands. Good effort and timing on the offensive glass. Needs to become more comfortable finishing with his left hand.

“He looked like John Simons in the games I saw,” said one camp coach. “He must’ve had nearly 10 3s over three games, and that’s with just watching a few minutes at a time. He also put it on the floor and drove it well, absorbing contact and finishing.”

“Versatile!,” a second coach said. “Very active off the ball and crashed the ‘O” board every time a shot went up. Runs in transition very well and is smooth for his size when he catches the ball going downhill. He’s lanky and uses his athleticism to finish in the open court. Nice jumper all the way out to the three-point line and drives the baseline well. Game is reminiscent of CC alum Kyle Cooper.”

“Big-time motor that never stops, and finishes,” added another coach. “Also has a nice shot.”

“I played with two Catholic Central forwards in college, and if he turns out anything like them he can’t help but be good,” another coach said.

Kind of like if you’re on this list …

Underclassman Camp MVPs

  • 2016: Davis Lukomski, Novi Catholic Central
  • 2015: Lamar Norman, Godwin Heights
  • 2014: Austin McCullough, Portage Central
  • 2013: Miles Bridges, Huntington Prep
  • 2012: Josh Jackson, Detroit Consortium
  • 2011: Eric Davis, Saginaw

DeAndre Carter  5-10  So  Muskegon: Some may have forgot about him since he played out of state with the Spiece Indy Heat, but they’ll remember Carter this winter. No guard at camp was faster end-to-end, as Carter proved often impossible to keep off the rim. He also advanced the ball with some long and on-time passes. Positive, vocal and confident like you want for the position. Still needs to work on the nuances of the 1, his half-court decision making, getting the right pass-shot balance.

“One of the top three points guards at camp,” a coach said. “Quick, quick, quick. Shake and bake, can finish, and hit the 3. He’s already a very dangerous cover, needs to learn change of speed and direction.”

“Fast as lightning point guard who gets into the lane at will,” said another. “Shows leadership and teammates definitely like seeing the ball in his hands because he drives it well enough to draw help and regularly finds the open man. Streaky shooter from the perimeter who seems to be hot more than he is cold. Plays tough defense on and off the ball. Reminds me of a less flashy version of Maurice Jones.”

Bank Hoops All-State Camp September 25

Cade Coleman  6-5  So  Davison: Rare combination of true college wing size and the ability to create for others or himself. With one notable exception, Coleman’s team may have been the most unselfish at camp and that was largely thanks to how he set things playing point guard. Rebounded, pushed it, got teammates easy looks. Also hit step-back and other closely guarded three-pointers. Best case scenario Travis Conlan or Derrick Dial — if he keeps the drive alive, stays motivated and plays with an edge, exploiting his physical advantages from the backcourt.

“Big guard who is dangerous in the open court,” a coach said. “He knows how to put a defender on his hip and finish through the contact he creates. Does a nice job of getting into the lane and creating for others. Sometimes struggles when being defended by quicker guards, and his ability to guard them will have to improve.

Nolan Foster  6-9  So  Mattawan: He has as much potential as any power forward to come through the camp outside of Deyonta Davis and Trevor Manuel. More along the Mike Edwards tier. Legit height, frame, wingspan, and a big kid who just seems to enjoy the game. Even though he had the longest trip down, Foster probably led the camp in diving on the floor for balls.

“Foster likes the block area, on offense as well as defense,” a coach said. “He will run through screens, signifying that he’s not soft. He was also a great teammate during camp.”

“Most big man upside at the camp,” said another. “‘Biggest big’ there, nice high ceiling. Sometimes foot-awkward but he makes up for it with his confidence and perseverance. Good hand-eye coordination with aggressive moves around the basket. Made put-backs and used the backboard with short mid-range shots.”

Added a third coach: “Raw big who plays very hard. Was the least polished of the 6-9 guys, but probably has the most upside. He boxes out well when shots go up and aggressively pursues rebounds. Needs a lot of work on his offensive skill set, but judging from the effort on the court he will probably put the work in. Good finisher and footwork in the lane with his right, but much improvement is needed when defenders play over his left shoulder and make him go left. Would like to see him try to block more shots from helpside.”

Caleb Hodgson  6-9  So  Dansville: Hodgson makes a repeat appearance on the top camp honor team, as he was the only rising freshman to crack it in 2015. As productive as any frontcourt player at camp. He made skilled offensive plays whether from the blocks with spin moves, unlikely extensions and backboard finishes, to away from the basket as Hodgson’s passing and shot-making to 20 feet allowed his team to invert the offense. Had a serious, competitive approach in his game matchups with other D1 power forward prospects Nolan Foster and Sage Walker. Would like to see him control more real estate in rebounding range and concede fewer boards.

“Caleb Hodgson was ‘blue collar tough’ when I watched him extensively during his second game,” a coach said. “Mixed it up constantly on both ends of the floor.”

“Most polished of all the bigs at camp,” another coach said. “Active and always working to get open in the post. Can finish with both hands around the hoop and uses his body well to create space. Boxes out every time a shot went up. Hit some from the high post. An improved jumpshot and quickness could definitely help him take his game to the next level.”

Sage Walker  6-9  So  Ithaca: If you were judging AAU teammates Walker or Sean Cobb this spring and summer, you weren’t getting the healthy versions. Walker came in and reminded everyone why we had him a top 10 prospect in 2019 after last year’s Underclassman Camp. Thinnest of the lot, but more likely than the other post players to get a tough rebound in traffic or pick and roll instead of pop (though hit shots from just inside the arc with no problem). Needs to work on basket orientation, feel for the post game, when to drop step, when to spin.

“He seemed to leave an impression on his drill coaches,” one coach said, half of them wanting to know who was this bouncy stretch 4. “Walker went hard in every station, and harder in the games. He played as if there were a scholarship on the line every play, all day.”

“Cerebral big man can run the floor and finish with either hand,” said another. “Has a very nice mid-range touch. Crafty around the rim. Top three big man at camp.”

“Good height and length, with the ability to play offensively from 17 feet and in,” another coach said. “Works hard on both ends of the floor, but can be moved out of post position by stronger bigs. Rebounds well on both ends, runs the floor and finishes in transition. Needs to get stronger, but despite his slender frame he doesn’t shy away from contact. Very high ceiling!”

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